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News Flash-One egg a day will not increase your risk of heart attack!

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News Flash-One egg a day will not increase your risk of heart attack!

We are here to unscramble the information out there that declares eggs to be bad guys for your health.  Maybe an angry chicken got the rumor started, but research can put the myths to bed.  Harvard Medical School has done studies and these, along with others following hundreds of thousands of people, find that eating up to one egg a day does not increase rates of heart attacks, strokes, or other cardiovascular diseases.  Research shows that most of the cholesterol in our body comes from our liver which produces it–not the cholesterol in the food we eat.  The liver is triggered to increase cholesterol production by saturated fats and trans fat.  More on that in a moment.  If you have certain health conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease, you should limit yourself to 3 eggs a week.  That’s the good news.  Here’s the not-so-good news…what might be bad for you is what you’re eating with eggs.  Artery-clogging bacon or cheese, and the saturated fats in doughnuts or muffins can definitely increase your risk of heart attack due to the effects of the saturated fats that trigger increased cholesterol production.  Try mixing your eggs with some vegetables or fresh salsa, and add a side of whole-grain toast.  From a bone-health point of view, eggs are not the highest food in calcium, but each large egg does have 25mg.  You’ll note from our previous blog that there were other foods with far higher calcium content, but every little bit adds up throughout the day.  The healthcare professionals at Paragon Orthopedics would encourage you to eat as much calcium as you can every day for strong bones.  Eating your sources of calcium, versus pills, is optimal for absorption.  Another added benefit: the 6g of protein in each egg will help you feel full longer.  To read the article by Harvard Medical School read here:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/are-eggs-risky-for-heart-health

Southern Oregon Orthopedics & Paragon Orthopedic Center